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Archive for the 'Writing Issues' Category

Tip of the Day: Determine Context

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on June 18th, 2012

Determine your context and the context of your audience for a website, blog, or other digital media that work for you and your audience. Begin with your context, and consider: What lead to the writing or design of this text? Why are you writing or designing this text? What constraints do you have on this […]

Tip of the Day: Consider Purpose!

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on June 6th, 2012

Consider your purpose and the purpose of your audience for a stronger website, blog, or other digital media. Start with your purpose. Why are you creating this text or media? What goals, results, ends, aims, means, or objectives are you trying to meet? Your purpose could include: • To persuade • To entertain • To […]

Screen Space 22: The Rhetorical Situation Part 2—Purpose and Context

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on June 4th, 2012

This is episode 22 of Screen Space “The Rhetorical Situation Part 2—Purpose and Context.” In this episode, I review rhetorical situation, which I introduced in episode 21. I cover the remaining two key parts of the rhetorical situation, purpose, and context, to help you design and develop stronger websites, blogs, and other digital media, purpose, and context. I wrap this series up next episode with an example of an actual rhetorical situation.

 
icon for podpress  Screen Space 22: The Rhetorical Situation Part 2—Purpose and Context [15:28m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

Tip of the Day: Analyze your audience!

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on September 7th, 2011

In the last Tip of the Day, I suggested that writing for one’s audience would lead to a stronger text. To do so, you must analyze your audience. When analyzing your audience, first consider demographics, like: Age Sex Location Language Race Ethnicity and Culture And much more Next consider how the audience is using your […]

Tip of the Day: Write to your audience for a stronger text

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on September 6th, 2011

If you write to your audience your text/media will be more successful, effective, efficient, and usable. Audience is the most important of the three parts of the rhetorical situation. If you do not fully consider and write or design for the audience, it doesn’t matter your purpose, context, or anything else. You were unsuccessful. If […]

Audience, purpose, and context are three key considerations any of communication. You must think about who you are writing to, why you are writing, and what the situation is (yours and theirs). If you consider these three things, your communication will be clearer and more effective. To find out more check out Screen Space 21: […]

Tip of the Day: How to figure out what the reading level of your text is

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on August 30th, 2011

In yesterday’s Tip of the Day, I discussed how the average US adult reads at an 8th grade reading level. So, if you are writing something to be read by the average American, you need to write at an 8th grade reading level. Today’s tip shows you how to figure that out. In Word 2010: […]

Screen Space 21: The Rhetorical Situation Part 1—Audience

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on August 30th, 2011

This is episode 21 of Screen Space “The Rhetorical Situation Part 1—Audience.” In this episode, I discuss the rhetorical situation in general and then focus on audience and how to analyze your audience.

 
icon for podpress  Screen Space 21: The Rhetorical Situation Part 1—Audience [20:26m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

The average reading level of adults in the US is 8th grade. So, if you are writing to the “average” American, you need to keep your texts at an 8th grade reading level. This means: Go for short and simples sentences Use shorter words Avoid jargon Use language your audience will understand Write in active […]

Back in the good ‘ol days of typewriters, writers used a tab indent to show where a new paragraph begins. Back in the good ‘ol days of the early web (think 1993), browsers were setup to render paragraphs with a line of white space after. More recently (say 2007), Microsoft decided that both were a […]