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Archive for the 'Web design' Category

Tip of the Day: Avoid Courier, unless you want to look like a relic!

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on June 20th, 2012

Avoid Courier, unless you want to look like a relic of a bygone age! As a symbol of typewriters and the 20th century, Courier is a dated typeface, and thus it can give texts a dated feel. Due to its use as common typewriter face, it reminds one of typewriters and business and government in […]

Tip of the Day: Determine Context

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on June 18th, 2012

Determine your context and the context of your audience for a website, blog, or other digital media that work for you and your audience. Begin with your context, and consider: What lead to the writing or design of this text? Why are you writing or designing this text? What constraints do you have on this […]

Courier was designed by Howard Kettler in 1955, as a commission for IBM. Kettler originally planned to call the typeface “Messenger,” but showing his true typographer stripes, went with the name he thought displayed the advantages of his typeface. According to Tom Vanderbilt, Kettler explained his choice, saying “A letter can be just an ordinary […]

Tip of the Day: Consider Purpose!

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on June 6th, 2012

Consider your purpose and the purpose of your audience for a stronger website, blog, or other digital media. Start with your purpose. Why are you creating this text or media? What goals, results, ends, aims, means, or objectives are you trying to meet? Your purpose could include: • To persuade • To entertain • To […]

Screen Space 21: The Rhetorical Situation Part 1—Audience

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on August 30th, 2011

This is episode 21 of Screen Space “The Rhetorical Situation Part 1—Audience.” In this episode, I discuss the rhetorical situation in general and then focus on audience and how to analyze your audience.

 
icon for podpress  Screen Space 21: The Rhetorical Situation Part 1—Audience [20:26m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

In order to celebrate the  last episode of the Usability and Usability Testing 101 series, this week’s tips focus on usability testing. The final steps of usability testing, after you have prepared for testing and conducted the testing, are not only fun, but easy if you follow my steps. First collate the data into findings. […]

Surf the web to be better at your job: Web surfing aids productivity

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on August 25th, 2011

Do you surf the web at work? Perhaps you sneak in a bit of surfing time between hard tasks or when boredom hits. A recent research study suggests that surfing the web may actually help you be more productive at work! Don J.Q. Chen and Vivien K.G Lim, of the National University of Singapore, presented […]

In order to celebrate the last episode of the Usability and Usability Testing 101 series, this week’s tips focus on usability testing. Once you have selected your user groups, created tasks, and prepared for testing, it is finally time to do those usability tests! With all this preparation the testing itself should be easy. Just […]

In order to celebrate the last episode (posting tonight!) of the Usability and Usability Testing 101 series, this week’s tips focus on usability testing. Once you have decided to conduct usability testing on your website, blog, or other digital media, you need to determine who you will be usability testing your media. First, you need […]

Anti-aliasing is used on images and visuals displayed on screens. Anti-aliasing takes an image designed for a higher resolution and smooths out the jagged edges so it will look better (and less distorted) at lower resolutions. Without anti-aliasing the images will appear pixelated—with jagged edges that are actual pixels being displayed. With anti-aliasing a gradient […]