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Archive for the 'Screen Design' Category

Mac reaches the big Three O

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on January 25th, 2014

NPR had a great story about the Mac turning 30 in which they talked with current Apple CEO Tim Cook. The story reminded me of why I am in usability and how innovative the Mac and Apple are/is. The Mac brought a user-centered interface to the users—a GUI (Graphical User Interface). When they designed it […]

Tip of the Day: Avoid Courier, unless you want to look like a relic!

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on June 20th, 2012

Avoid Courier, unless you want to look like a relic of a bygone age! As a symbol of typewriters and the 20th century, Courier is a dated typeface, and thus it can give texts a dated feel. Due to its use as common typewriter face, it reminds one of typewriters and business and government in […]

Screen Space 21: The Rhetorical Situation Part 1—Audience

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on August 30th, 2011

This is episode 21 of Screen Space “The Rhetorical Situation Part 1—Audience.” In this episode, I discuss the rhetorical situation in general and then focus on audience and how to analyze your audience.

 
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Anti-aliasing is used on images and visuals displayed on screens. Anti-aliasing takes an image designed for a higher resolution and smooths out the jagged edges so it will look better (and less distorted) at lower resolutions. Without anti-aliasing the images will appear pixelated—with jagged edges that are actual pixels being displayed. With anti-aliasing a gradient […]

Screen Space 18: Usability & Usability Testing 101 Part 4—Preparing the Testing

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on August 8th, 2011

Welcome to Screen Space, your podcast about creating usable, accessible, effective, and efficient web, blog, and digital media design for the everyday (and non-expert) designer. This is episode 18 of Screen Space “Usability & Usability Testing 101 Part 4—Preparing the Testing.” In this episode, I discuss the third step of usability testing—preparing the testing. There will be two more parts to this series, where I will discuss conducting the testing and then analyzing and utilizing the results from the testing.

If you have not listened to the previous parts of this series, you may want to go back and listen. In the first part, Screen Space 11: Usability & Usability Testing 101, I discuss usability, provide a definition of usability testing, and outline the steps to conduct a usability test. In Part 2, Screen Space 12: Usability & Usability Testing 101 Part 2—Selecting Users, you can find information on selecting your users for usability testing. In Part 3, Screen Space 17: Usability & Usability Testing 101 Part 3—Deciding what to Test, I discuss the steps to setting objectives and selecting tasks to test. You may also find Screen Space 10 on User-Centered Design helpful.

I am your host, Dr. Jennifer L. Bowie. I conduct research and have taught in areas related to digital media, web, and blog design. Previously I mentioned being an assistant professor at GSU. However, this is no longer the case and I am currently looking for a job in usability, user-centered design, and/or social media. Stay tuned and I’ll provide details at the end of this podcast.

A warm welcome this week to my new listeners from Liverpool, London, and Manchester in the UK. Welcome to Screen Space and design well! Another warm welcome to my loyal listeners. Welcome to another episodes and thanks for listening!

In this episode, I will present the next step in usability testing: preparing for the testing. This includes choosing the order of tasks, creating written test materials, recruiting participants, defining team members’ roles, creating a written test plan, practicing the testing, and preparing the test environment. I will use the same example I used in episodes 11, 12, and 17—testing a photography blog. We’ll imagine we have a photography blog with a decent sized audience. We want to get more users and see how useable the blog is for your current users.

 
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Chunking is a design concept based on proximity.  A good designer uses proximity to show the relationships of design components. Two items that are close (like a heading and the paragraph of text under it) should be related, and two that are far away (a title and the footer) are not related (or less related). […]

Back in the good ‘ol days of typewriters, writers used a tab indent to show where a new paragraph begins. Back in the good ‘ol days of the early web (think 1993), browsers were setup to render paragraphs with a line of white space after. More recently (say 2007), Microsoft decided that both were a […]

Screen Space 17: Usability & Usability Testing 101 Part 3—Deciding what to Test

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on August 1st, 2011

[Podcast Transcript] Welcome to Screen Space, your podcast about creating usable, accessible, effective, and efficient web, blog, and digital media design for the everyday (and non-expert) designer. This is episode 17 of Screen Space “Usability & Usability Testing 101 Part 3—Deciding what to Test.” In this episode, I discuss the second major step of usability […]

 
icon for podpress  Screen Space 17: Usability & Usability Testing 101 Part 3—Deciding what to Test [17:18m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

Consider Garamond for any print document where readability and legibility are important, where you want to fit a lot of text on a page, and when you want to be eco-friendly. Garamond is a highly readable and legible typeface for print use. It is also eco-friendly—save trees and use toner by using Garamond. Garamond works […]

Use the correct, more readable, and preferred “curly” quotes in your writing. Due to first the advent of typewriters and later our good friend ASCII, the normal “curly” quotation marks of printing were turned into ambidextrous "straight" quotes. This saved two keys on typewriters (as only one is needed for the ‘single quote’ and one […]