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Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

Use the correct, more readable, and preferred “curly” quotes in your writing. Due to first the advent of typewriters and later our good friend ASCII, the normal “curly” quotation marks of printing were turned into ambidextrous "straight" quotes. This saved two keys on typewriters (as only one is needed for the ‘single quote’ and one […]

Typeface of the Week: Georgia on my mind… for web design

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on July 7th, 2011

Georgia was designed by award-winning type designer Matthew Carter. Carter created Georgia as a screen typeface, and it is quite readable on screen with high x-heights and wider characters.  Georgia was designed to go with one of Carter’s earlier screen typeface, Verdana, a sans serif typeface.  Carter created Verdana and Georgia for Microsoft, and Georgia […]

E-book publishing trends: Interactivity, vetting, and more

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on January 24th, 2011

While I just discussed that there does not need to be a winner in the e-books vs. print books battle, there is however a battle plan, or at least predicted trends for e-books. Philip Ruppel, the president of publishing company McGraw-Hill Professional, presents his thoughts on the “5 E-Book Trends That Will Change the Future […]

The Battle Between Books and E-Books: Winner be both?

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on January 22nd, 2011

The death of print books has been predicted for at least 20 years. In my classes where we discuss writing and technology a hot debate, and hot since I was taking these classes in the late 90s, is whether digital technology will be the end of print books, as discussed for instance by Coover in […]

Tracking your 15 minutes of fame: How info is shared online

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on January 14th, 2011

Do you ever wonder why some blog posts are so popular and others get no notice? Researchers Leskovec and Yang have wondered this and did something about it by analyzing patterns in how news stories are shared online. Their findings can help predict the rise and fall of popularity of news stories and the sharing […]

Research supports free ebooks!

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on March 10th, 2010

Bloggers, podcasters, and other social media experts have often claimed that the release of free digital content, like podcasts of books, helps books sales. Grammar Girl and Scott Sigler have proven this true in their own ways. But now there is more than anecdotal evidence. Researchers at BYU found that release of free ebooks correlates […]

Writing and Editing in Cave Times

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on January 26th, 2010

Some things never change… ….

So everyone is an Author now?

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on October 31st, 2009

With blogs, twitter, social networking sites, is everyone a writer or better yet, an author now? No, but according to Pelli & Bigelow in A Writing Revolution , everyone will be an author in 2013. Yes, in just four short years everyone will be an author. Get ready to read! A lot! The idea behind […]

Screen Space: Announcement & Invitation for Scholarly Writing (or other) Month

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on October 30th, 2009

This is a special edition announcement episode of Screen Space your podcast about creating usable, accessible, effective, and efficient web, blog, and new media design for the everyday (and non-expert) designer.

I invite those of you in academia to join me for something I am trying in November: Scholarly Writing Month (or ScoWriMo). For those of you who are not academics, sick around and consider joining this adventure in your own way.

 
icon for podpress  Screen Space: Announcement & Invitation for Scholarly Writing (or other) Month [12:57m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

NaNoWriMo for the Rest of Us: Scholarly Writing & More Month

Posted by Jennifer L. Bowie, Ph.D. on October 30th, 2009

Your are cordially invited to join me for SchoWriMo! As many may know, November is the “National Novel Writing Month” where participants try to write a novel (defined as 175-pages/50,000-words) during this month (see What is NaNoWriMo? for more details). As an academic, this concept always intrigued me, but didn’t work for me for three […]